Bird flu in Rostock Zoo: All storks dead

Bird flu in Rostock Zoo: All storks dead

Bird flu in Rostock Zoo: All storks dead
10.01.2015

All twelve white storks in the Rostock Zoo were infected with the H5N8 bird flu virus. Three died, the rest were killed as a precaution. All other bird species in the zoo are now to be examined for the pathogen.

All twelve white storks infected The twelve white storks of the Rostock Zoo were all infected with the H5N8 bird flu virus. This has shown initial analyzes, according to the Ministry of Agriculture in Schwerin, according to a message from the dpa news agency. Now all birds in the zoo (around 500) should be examined for the pathogen. According to the information, three storks had died in the past few days and nine had been killed as a precaution, as well as 23 ducks housed in the same barn.

Storks are more susceptible to the influenza virus According to the Friedrich Loeffler Institute for the Health of Farm Animals, storks are more susceptible to the influenza virus than ducks and geese. "These water birds form the natural reservoir for the virus, they have been dealing with it for millennia," explained institute spokeswoman Elke Reinking on the Baltic island of Riems. In contrast to about chicken birds, the water birds showed no signs of disease despite infection. This is also the case with farm poultry.

Birds have become infected because of their proximity to one another. According to Reinking, the storks have also been infected because of their proximity to one another. In captivity, however, birds are generally not more susceptible to viruses than in the wild. It is still unknown how H5N8 affects songbirds. Rostock Zoo was closed on Friday due to bird flu. "There is no new situation, but we first want to wait for the results of the remaining samples and be on the safe side," explained zoo director Udo Nagel.

Other pathogens have proven to be dangerous in the past The virus subtype H5N8, which had already been detected in poultry farms in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and Lower Saxony in November and December, was only found in Asia until relatively recently. In recent years, pathogens like H7N9 or H5N1 have proven to be particularly dangerous. In infected people, typical bird flu symptoms, which usually initially resemble those of conventional flu, did not show up until weeks later. This leads to complaints such as fever, cough, sore throat and, in some cases, shortness of breath. In rare cases, symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting occur. (ad)

Image: Gila Hanssen / pixelio.de

Author and source information



Video: Patna Zoo म Bird Flu क डर, Christmas और New year पर नह कर पएग मसत! Bihar Tak