Lack of exercise causes fatal thrombosis in women

Lack of exercise causes fatal thrombosis in women

Attention women! Physical inactivity increases the risk of thrombosis
According to a new study, women with low physical fitness have a significantly higher risk of thrombosis than fit women. Scientists were able to demonstrate that even moderate training can lead to significantly positive effects in a comparatively short time. In Germany alone, around 100,000 people die each year as a result of venous thrombosis.

Lower fitness increases the risk of thrombosis
According to the German Society for Angiology / Society for Vascular Medicine (DGA), the number of thromboses and the associated complications in the form of pulmonary embolism has increased in recent years. Undetected thrombosis quickly becomes a life-threatening condition. In Germany alone, an estimated 100,000 people die each year as a result of venous thrombosis. Austrian researchers have now found that women with low physical fitness have a significantly higher risk of thrombosis.

Symptoms are sometimes confused with sore muscles
With thrombosis, a blood clot (thrombus) forms, which can narrow a vessel or completely block it. If the blood clot is washed into the lungs with the blood stream, it can block blood vessels there and cause pulmonary embolism, which is often fatal. Blood clots can also cause a heart attack or stroke, as well as other circulatory disorders. Persistent back pain, reddish discoloration and swelling can be an indication of thrombosis. Experts also point out that thick legs, swollen legs and a feeling of tension - often in the back of the knee - can be warning signs of thrombosis. The symptoms are often confused with sore muscles.

Blood clots can clog blood vessels
According to a press release from the Medical University of Vienna (MedUni Vienna), women with low physical fitness show a significantly higher platelet activation than women with average or very good fitness. This is the central result of a study with 62 young women supported by the Austrian Heart Fund, which was carried out by the research groups around Ivo Volf (Institute for Physiology at MedUni Vienna) and Rochus Pokan (Institute for Sport Science at the University of Vienna). Activation of platelets (platelets) may lead to the formation of potentially life-threatening thrombi. These blood clots can block blood vessels (thrombosis) and cause loss of blood supply to organs. The scientists recently published their results in the journal "Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise".

Increased fitness quickly leads to normalization
In addition, the researchers were able to demonstrate that increased fitness quickly leads to normalization of platelet function - running training of a maximum of 40 minutes, three times a week, over a period of two months was sufficient. According to the university's announcement, cardiovascular diseases and their acute forms such as heart attacks or strokes are the most common cause of death worldwide. According to the experts, the development process of these diseases, which takes several decades, is favored by various risk factors that negatively affect the function of different target cells influence. Activation of blood platelets can therefore lead to a merger of these cells and thus to the formation of a thrombus, as a result of which the blood flow is impeded.

Even moderate training quickly leads to positive effects
The study showed that even moderate training leads to significantly positive effects in a comparatively short time - and to an adjustment of the values ​​of platelet activation to that of the two fitter test groups. Lead author Stefan Heber said: “Latent activated platelets release a large number of mediators that promote the development of atherosclerotic vascular changes. If low physical fitness goes hand in hand with a higher degree of platelet activation, an impact on the earliest phases of this disease development is therefore conclusive. The training effects shown here fit very well with epidemiological data, according to which trained people have an approximately 40 percent lower risk of cardiovascular events compared to physically inactive people. ”The new findings could make an important contribution to the assessment of the preventive effectiveness of different training methods and intensities deliver. "Platelet-based studies could open up undreamt-of possibilities in direct and short-term comparison of the effectiveness of various training programs in the field of cardiovascular disease prevention," says research group leader Ivo Volf. (ad)

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