Soaked tampon? New app reports necessary change

Soaked tampon? New app reports necessary change

New invention: App reports when tampon needs to be changed
Women who have their days are usually advised to change tampons and sanitary pads at least every two hours, as otherwise there is a risk to health. In the future, a new app will inform users when it is time to change. The “smart tampon” should be available from 2017.

Health hazards from tampons
When it comes to proper intimate hygiene during menstruation, women are usually advised to change tampons and pads at least every two hours. If tampons remain in the vagina for too long, there are sometimes life-threatening dangers. For example, last year there was a case of a young girl who died from Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) because she forgot to change the tampon. In the future, a new invention could help girls and women to remember the change. A company from the United States is currently working on tampons that communicate via Bluetooth when they are full.

Gadget measures how full the tampon is
A start-up company from the United States is currently producing special tampons that communicate via Bluetooth when they are full and it is time to change. The tampon is connected to a gadget by a ribbon, which measures how full the tampon is. This information is sent to an app. The gadget is attached to the waistband of the underpants. The so-called "My.Flow" tampons are expected to come onto the market in 2017. According to media reports, the sensor should cost a one-time fee of around 40 euros. The necessary tampons are to be sold in a 50-piece subscription for just under eleven euros.

New invention to prevent toxic shock syndrome
My.Flow is said to prevent, among other things, Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS). It is an infectious disease with the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Theoretically, the bacteria can penetrate the body through any wound, but the pathogens often get into the body via tampons, especially if they remain in the body for too long. In addition to high fever, typical symptoms include headache, dizziness, a drop in blood pressure, an itchy rash, as well as muscle pain, nausea and diarrhea. Infection can lead to severe circulatory and organ failure.

Rare illness can be fatal
Colloquially, TSS is also referred to as "tampon disease". With an infection rate of one person per 200,000 people per year, the rate is very rare. However, the disease can also be fatal, as various cases have shown. A celebrity's TSS case attracted international attention a few years ago. Former Vogue model Lauren Wasser lost a leg at the time, although she said she had followed the rules and changed her tampons regularly. The American is certain that incorrect material and a lack of information are to blame for everything. Since then, the ex-model has campaigned for a change in the materials used for tampons. According to some experts, tampons made from 100 percent cotton would pose a significantly lower risk. The majority of producers - also in Germany - use a mix of viscose fiber and cotton, or pure viscose. (ad)

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